Semesterübersicht

Semesterübersicht Wintersemester 2019/2020

Sommersemester 2019 - Wintersemester 2019/2020 - Sommersemester 2020

Dienstag, 08.10 2019

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

Sonderseminar: 14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Garth Huber, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
see attached pdf

Sonderseminar

Donnerstag, 10.10 2019

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Christoph Ortner, University of Warwick
Accurate molecular simulation requires computationally expensive quantum chemistry models that makes simulating complex material phenomena or large molecules intractable. The past decade has seen a revival of interatomic potentials (IPs), fast but traditionally inaccurate surrogate models, re-casting their construction as an approximation and data-fitting problem. I will give an introduction to this problem, from a mixed modelling / data / mathematics perspective. In particular I want to show how it can be formalised as a high-dimensional approximation problem, with many structures that can be exploited to make it tractable. I will introduce two approximation schemes, both using different symmetric polynomials, targeting in particular efficiency and transferability, some preliminary simulation results, and the beginnings of a rigorous numerical analysis. Joint work with Geneviève Dusson (CNRS Besançon), Markus Bachmayr (Mainz), Gabor Csanyi and Cas van der Oord (Cambridge), Simon Etter (NU Singapur).

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

11:15 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Genevive Dusson, University of Warwick
I will present the practical construction of interatomic potentials for materials and molecules based on a body-order expansion (ANOVA, HDRM), each body order being represented by polynomials satisfying the rotation and permutation symmetry of the "exact" potential energy surface. These polynomials are determined in a data-driven fashion from linear fits trained with ab initio data. I will report convergence tests on training sets for materials and molecules, illustrating the accuracy, the low computational cost, and the systematic improvability of the potential. I will then outline a range of the regularisation procedures that we incorporate into the polynomial fits to achieve transferability of the potentials. Finally, I will outline a testing framework to stress-test the generalisation capabilities of new potentials far from the training set. Joint work with Alice Allen (Cambridge), Gbor Csnyi (Cambridge), Christoph Ortner (Warwick), and Cas van der Oord (Cambridge).
Dienstag, 15.10 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., Socialroom

Fatemeh Elahi, IPM, Tehran
A few hundred cold gas clouds were recently discovered, each situated a few hundred parsecs from the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. These gas clouds can provide unprecedented sensitivity to dark matter-standard model interactions. The main physical basis is simple: dark matter tends to have a higher temperature than the coldest interstellar and intergalactic gas. Therefore, dark matter can heat the gas to higher-than-observed temperatures, if dark matter interacts enough with baryons or electrons in the gas cloud. In this talk, I will discuss the bounds cold gas clouds give on ultra-light dark photon, vector portal, and millicharged dark matter.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Wick Haxton, Department of Physics, Berkeley
There is a great deal of experimental effort being invested in laboratory searches for heavy dark matter particles, where the signal is a recoiling nucleus produce by dark matter elastic scattering. An interesting question is the number of experiments that will need to be done to ensure that the available discovery space has been adequately covered. Post discovery, a related question will be the number of independent experiment that will need to be completed, to fully characterize the interaction. I will describe an approach based on effective theory that allows one to address these and other questions.
Montag, 21.10 2019

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

J. Diefenbach, Mainz
Strahlenschutzunterweisung Kernphysik

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. John M. Schwantes, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA, USA
The young science of nuclear forensics was born out of a response to discoveries of weapons-usable nuclear Materials Out of Regulatory Control (MORC) in northern Europe in the early 1990s. This science not only supports law enforcement response to MORC events but represents a key component of nuclear security for any nation with nuclear or radiological materials holdings. Since the birth of nuclear forensic science, efforts like the Nuclear Security Summit, the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, as well as those by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group have strengthened nuclear forensics capabilities worldwide. Here, the capabilities and limitations of nuclear forensic science are described and several examples of applications of nuclear forensics in support of emergency response, law enforcement, and national security are provided.
Dienstag, 22.10 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Andreas Helset, Bohr Institute
We formulate an effective field theory describing large mass scalars and fermions minimally coupled to gravity. The operators of this effective field theory are organized in powers of the transfer momentum divided by the mass of the matter field, an expansion which lends itself to the efficient extraction of classical contributions from loop amplitudes in both the post-Newtonian and post-Minkowskian regimes. We use this effective field theory to calculate the classical and leading quantum gravitational scattering amplitude of two heavy spin-1/2 particles at the second post-Minkowskian order.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Andreas Burkert, Faculty of Physics, LMU Munich
Disk Galaxies: Our Fascinating Cosmic Habitats
Donnerstag, 24.10 2019

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:15 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Joerg Steinkamp, ZDV, Uni Mainz
Research data management and data archiving at ZDV/JGU with iRODS
Montag, 28.10 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Michael Goedel, Institut für Physik
Track reconstruction in Project 8

Masterkolloqium

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

O. Javier Hernandez, Mainz
Nuclear structure corrections in muonic deuterium
Dienstag, 29.10 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Alexey Vladimirov, Regensburg University
The evolution of transverse momentum dependent distributions or TMD-evolution differs from ordinary renormalization group evolution in several aspects. Two main ones are its double-scale nature and the presence of non-perturbative component. In the talk, I review the recent progress in studies of TMD-evolution, including the proof of rapidity-divergence renormalization, soft-rapidity correspondence, zeta-prescription, and comparison with the experimental measurements.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Rupert Huber, Institut für Physik, Universität Regensburg
Nanoelectronics faster than a cycle of light
Mittwoch, 30.10 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Verena Spatz, TU Darmstadt
Physics Education It is a widely held view that in the field of physics education the implementation of scientific findings into instruction practice should be a critical issue, however the record of research results on genuine classroom activities is generally poor. In the seminar, a project will be presented, that aims at closing this research-practice gap. In the project, novel teaching units on the introduction to Newtonian mechanics were developed and evaluated, based on empirical studies concerning common pre-instruction ideas, which students bring along into school. Some of these ideas are appropriate, whereas many are inappropriate to build upon in physics lessons. A very popular erroneous idea about motion is that a force is needed to keep an object moving at constant velocity. This novices concept has to be changed into an experts concept, that a force is needed only to change the velocity of an object. As illustrated in this example, teaching and learning physics often requires conceptual change. Considering this, the content area itself had to be restructured and teaching materials had to be prepared to meet students learning needs. An accompanying quasi-experimental field study with grade seven classes showed a significant improvement of students conceptual understanding.
Donnerstag, 31.10 2019

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Stephen D. Hogan, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, UK
Rydberg states, the bound quantum states of an attractive 1/r potential, play a central role in many precision spectroscopic tests of fundamental physics with atoms and molecules, e.g., [1,2]. As perhaps the simplest Rydberg system, the positronium atom - composed of an electron bound to its antiparticle the positron, and therefore a purely leptonic system described almost entirely by bound state QED theory - offers unique opportunities for studies of this kind. However, because of its short ground-state annihilation lifetime (142 ns) many precision experiments with positronium must be performed with longer-lived excited states - Rydberg states. The efficient preparation of Rydberg states in positronium is now possible following developments in positron beam and trap technologies [3], and the motion of the atoms excited to these states can be controlled and manipulated using inhomogeneous electric fields through the methods of Rydberg-Stark deceleration [4]. In this talk I will describe new precision microwave spectroscopic measurements of the triplet n=2 fine structure in positronium that takes advantage of these developments. I will also present a new technique for performing matter-wave interferometry with atoms in Rydberg states that has been developed using helium atoms [5], but in the future could be exploited for accurate gravity measurements with Rydberg positronium. [1] A. Beyer, L. Maisenbacher, A. Matveev, R. Pohl, K. Khabarova, A. Grinin, T. Lamour, D. C. Yost, Th. W. Hänsch, N. Kolachevsky, and Th. Udem, The Rydberg constant and proton size from atomic hydrogen, Science 358, 79 (2017) [2] N. Hölsch, M. Beyer, E. J. Salumbides, K. S. E. Eikema, W. Ubachs, Ch. Jungen, and F. Merkt, Benchmarking Theory with an Improved Measurement of the Ionization and Dissociation Energies of H2, Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 103002 (2019) [3] T. E. Wall, A. M. Alonso, B. S. Cooper, A. Deller, S. D. Hogan, and D. B. Cassidy, Selective Production of Rydberg-Stark States of Positronium, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 173001 (2015) [4] S. D. Hogan, Rydberg-Stark deceleration of atoms and molecules, EPJ Techniques and Instrumentation 3, 1 (2016) [5] J. E. Palmer and S. D. Hogan, Electric Rydberg-atom interferometry, Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 250404 (2019)
Montag, 04.11 2019

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Laura Moschini, Brüssel
Dissociation of exotic nuclei at high energy

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Sascha Rau, Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg
High-precision measurement of the deuterons atomic mass
Dienstag, 05.11 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Enrico Morgante, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität
The relaxion mechanism is a proposed solution to the hierarchy problem, in which the EW scale is set by the classical evolution of a scalar field in the early universe. In this talk, I will review this construction and discuss some recent developments.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Special Colloquium in Memory of Professor Ernst Otten, Mainz
Prof. Dr. Michèle Leduc, Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris
"Optical pumping of Helium-3 and MRI lung imaging"

Prof. Dr. Wilfried Nörtershäuser, Technische Universität Darmstadt
"Atomic spectroscopy and nuclear structure"

Prof. Dr. Christian Weinheimer, Universität Münster
"The search for the neutrino mass"

Prof. Dr. Werner Heil, Universität Mainz
"Ernst Otten’s Persönlichkeit - Prägung und Wirken der WA EXAKT unter seiner Leitung"

Please notice different time and location: Staudinger Lecture Hall/Foyer, Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermann Weg 10, Tea from 3.00pm

Mittwoch, 06.11 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Karin Schönning, Upsala University
Many challenges in modern physics manifest themselves in the proton. Despite being known for a century, it is to this day difficult to describe properties like its mass, spin, structure, size and abundance from first principles. One strategy when you have a system you don’t fully understand, is to make a small change to the system and see how it reacts. In the case of the proton, we can replace one of the light quarks with a heavier one and thereby obtain a hyperon. Hyperons have the advantage over protons and neutrons that their spin is traceable through their weak, parity violating and thereby self-analysing decay. In this talk, I will outline how various aspects of hyperons can shed light on two of the puzzles related to the proton: the structure and the abundance. In particular, I will discuss how two recent measurement by the BESIII collaboration exploit the unique properties of hyperons and pave the way for a new generation of hyperon physics experiments.
Donnerstag, 07.11 2019

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Fabian Berressem, Institut für Physik
BoltzmaNN: Deriving equations of state and effective pair potentials using neural networks
Freitag, 08.11 2019

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Stephan Schlamminger, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, USA
Up to May 20th this year, there was one mass on earth that we knew with absolute precision, i.e., zero uncertainty. This mass was the international prototype of the kilogram. Since May 20th, it is just another mass and thew mass unit is now defined via a fixed value of the Planck constant, h=6.62607015×〖10〗^(-34) "J s" with zero uncertainty. In this presentation, I will explain how the unit of mass can be realized at the kilogram scale via the Kibble balance and the X-ray crystal density method. In the present SI, it is, however, no longer necessary to realize the unit at the cardinal point of 1 kg, it can be realized at any scale. The talk will present some future possibilities of this scale invariant definition of the mass unit.

Sondertermin - Bitte um Beachtung!

Montag, 11.11 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Johannes Damp, Institut für Physik
The Level-1 Topological Processor at ATLAS: Trigger Performance and Future Upgrades

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Hans Christian Lange, Mainz
We construct a chiral effective Lagrangian for e.-m. transitions between vector and pseudoscalar mesons (PVgamma). Based on an organization scheme in 1/Nc and the quark masses, we fit up to 12 decays and compare the results of our model with the experimental values given in PDG2018. We will extend our framework to the Dalitz decays PVl+l- and compare the calculated decay rates and transition form factors with recent experimental results.
Dienstag, 12.11 2019

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Warren S. Warren, Department of Physics, Duke University
Applying new Physics Insights to improve Tissue Imaging
Mittwoch, 13.11 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Alejandro Kievsky, INFN Pisa
The short-range interaction between particles many times shows a strong repulsion that strongly correlated the many-body system. In the particular case of a two-body shallow state, very extended compared to the range of the interaction, the three-body system has universal behavior. There is an infinite number of states geometrically accumulated at E=0. This is the Efimov effect predicted by V. Efimov in 1970 and experimentally verified more than 25 years later. I will discuss how universal behavior emerges in strongly correlated systems as liquid drops or light nuclear systems and how this behavior propagates as the number of particle increases.
Donnerstag, 14.11 2019

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Johannes W. Deiglmayr, Felix-Bloch Institute, Universität Leipzig
Exciting an atom or molecule into a high-lying electronic state, a Rydberg state, changes its properties in a drastic, but very well-understood way. While the binding energy of the Rydberg electron decrease with the principal quantum number n as 1/n^2, the orbital radius and transition dipole moments increase as n^2. This results in the electric polarizability increasing as n^7. I will present recent experiments in which we have exploited these scaling laws and exaggerated properties to perform precision measurements of ionization energies with relative accuracies up to 10^11, to characterize precisely static and alternating electric fields, and to reduce the detrimental role of stray fields in applications of Rydberg atoms. In a second part, I’ll discuss our progress towards extracting accurate scattering phase shifts from the spectroscopy of hetero-nuclear long-range Rydberg molecules, which are bound by the interaction of the Rydberg electron with ground-state atoms within its orbit, and how we plan to exploit the exotic properties of long-range Rydberg molecules to create ultracold, strongly correlated plasmas.
Montag, 18.11 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Peter Berta, Institut für Physik
Pileup mitigation for jets with Iterative Constituent Subtraction

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Asia Sobczyk, Valencia
Nuclear effects for neutrino oscillation studies

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Simon Sels, CERN
Recent developments for laser spectroscopy of short-lived isotopes at radioactive ion beam facilities
Dienstag, 19.11 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Leonardo Vernazza, Nikhef
Scattering processes near threshold develop large logarithms, that need to be resummed. In my talk I will focus in particular on electroweak annihilation processes, such as Drell-Yan and Higgs production in gluon fusion, and discuss the underlying factorisation theorems which allow the resummation of such logarithms at next-to-leading power, comparing diagrammatic and effective field theory methods.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Werner Krauth, Laboratoire de Physique, cole normale suprieure, CNRS Paris
Fast irreversible Markov chains in statistical physics
Mittwoch, 20.11 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Christian Weinheimer, Universität Münster
Since the discovery of neutrino oscillation we know that neutrinos have non-zero masses, but we do not know the absolute neutrino mass scale, which is as important for cosmology as for particle physics. The direct search for a non-zero neutrino mass from endpoint spectra of weak decays is complementary to the search for neutrinoless double beta-decay and analyses of cosmological data. Today the most stringent direct limits on the neutrino mass originate from investigations of the electron energy spectra of tritium beta-decay. The next generation experiment KATRIN, the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment, is improving the sensitivity from the tritium beta decay experiments at Mainz and Troitsk of 2 eV/c^2 by one order of magnitude probing the region relevant for structure formation in the universe. KATRIN uses a strong windowless gaseous molecular tritium source combined with a huge MAC-E-Filter as electron spectrometer. To achieve the sensitivity, KATRIN has been putting many technologies at their limits. The full 70m long setup has been successfully commissioned. From early 2019 on KATRIN is taking high statistics tritium data hunting for the neutrino mass. In this talk an introduction into the necessity to determine the neutrino mass and the status in the field will be given, followed by a detailed presentation of KATRIN and its results from the first KATRIN science run. The new results are already bringing KATRIN into the lead position of the field. In the outlook the perspectives of KATRIN for the coming years and new technologies in the field to potentially improve further the sensitivity on the neutrino mass will be presented.
Donnerstag, 21.11 2019

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Dr. Anbumozhi Angayarkan Somasundaram, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, Israel
Phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids complexed with hyaluronan (HA) have been proposed to form strongly lubricating boundary layers at biosurfaces such as articular cartilage. Depending on the type of PC used, efficient lubrication with friction coefficients down to 10-4 under physiologically high pressures (~100 atm) have been observed. This was attributed to hydration lubrication, acting at the highly hydrated phosphocholine headgroups of the PC lipids, exposed at the liposome surfaces. Such hydration layers can sustain large compressions without water molecules being squeezed out from the gap between sliding surfaces. At the same time, the hydration shells can relax rapidly, ensuring a fluid like response under applied shear. This combination of low shear stresses while sliding under high normal stresses results in very low friction coefficients, an effect termed hydration lubrication. We use the surface force balance (SFB) to examine interactions between polymer layers, in particular how normal interactions and especially frictional interactions, are modified when PC liposomes are added surface in pure water and in aqueous salt solutions, mimicking the presence of macromolecules on the surface of cartilage.
Montag, 25.11 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

John Rack-Helleis, Institut für Physik
Efficiency determination of the wavelength-shifting optical module

Masterkolloqium

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Farah Afzal, Bonn
Baryon spectroscopy via measurement of polarization observables

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Sebastian Raeder, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt
Shedding light on heavy actinides - laser spectroscopic investigations of Es and Fm isotopes in Mainz
Dienstag, 26.11 2019

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Torsten Enßlin, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching
Information Field Theory: Turning Data into Images
Mittwoch, 27.11 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Javier Menéndez, Universitad de Barcelona
The rare decay of atomic nuclei known as neutrinoless double-beta Decay is a unique process. Here, a nucleus decays by turning two neutrons into two protons, emitting two electrons without the usual balance of antineutrinos. Therefore, two particles---two electrons---are effectively created. Neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising attempt to test lepton number conservation in the laboratory. The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would proof that neutrinos are its own antiparticle, can clarify the origin of the prevalence of matter over antimatter in the universe, and determine the absolute neutrino mass. In spite of formidable experimental efforts, neutrinoless double-beta decay remains elusive, with half-live limits set over 10^25 years in some nuclei. The decay rate depends critically on the nuclear structure of the initial and final nuclei. This is encoded in the nuclear matrix element, which is key to anticipate the reach of experiments and to fully extract all physics information from a future measurement. In this PRISMA+ colloquium I will summarize the status of double-beta decay searches, and highlight recent efforts to obtain reliable nuclear matrix elements from first principles.
Donnerstag, 28.11 2019

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Juan Manuel Cornejo-Garcia, Institut für Quantenoptik, Universität Hannover
Cosmological observations point to an apparent imbalance of matter and antimatter in our universe, which contrasts with the nearly perfect symmetry arising on the level of single particles. Tests for hypothetical limits to this symmetry rest on high precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of particles and antiparticles - for example, with measurements of the proton and antiproton g-factors in Penning traps. However, these measurements rely on cooling and detections schemes that are highly sensitive on the particle's motional energy [1,2]. In this talk, it will be shown an alternative experimental method which enables a speed up of the particles' preparation and a boost in readout fidelity in the respective experiments [3]. Our method allows for sympathetic cooling of a proton or antiproton to its quantum mechanical ground state and provides readout of their spin state, by means of coupling to a laser cooled 9Be+ ion co-trapped in a double well potential. In addition, an overview of the current experimental setup featuring a cryogenic Penning trap stack for first demonstrations of motional coupling between two 9Be+ ions will be presented. [1] C. Smorra et al., Nature 550, 371-374 (2017) [2] G. Schneider et al., Science 358, 1081-1084 (2017) [3] D. J. Wineland et al., J. Res. NIST 103, 259-328 (1998)
Montag, 02.12 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Florian Thomas, Institut für Physik
Ultra-fast ray-tracing for the Wavelength-Shifting Optical Module

Masterkolloqium

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Vadim Lensky, Mainz
Nuclear structure contribution to the Lamb shift of muonic deuterium in pionless effective field theory

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Daniel Glckman, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung
Ultra-trace determination of actinides in clay systems with accelerator mass spectrometry and development of a diffusion setup for reducing conditions
Dienstag, 03.12 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Matthias Heller, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität
The Drell-Yan production of charged lepton pairs is one of the key processes measured at hadron colliders. The QCD corrections to the cross-section are known to order $alpha_s^2$ and electroweak corrections are known to order $alpha$. The next important step for a better theoretical understanding is the complete calculation of the mixed QCD-EW corrections of order $alpha alpha_s$. In this talk, I report on the first calculation of the virtual two-loop corrections of order $alpha alpha_s$ to the cross-section. The calculation is carried out analytically using tensor reduction, IBP relations and the method of differential equations. We validate a previous calculation of the subset of mixed QCD-QED corrections and show how the jet and soft functions of that reference can be used to subtract the infrared divergencies of the complete mixed QCD-electroweak virtual corrections. In the talk, I will focus on the calculation of the master integrals, which involve algebraic letters in the differential equation.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Hendrik Hildebrandt, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, RU Bochum
Observational cosmology with redshift galaxy
Donnerstag, 05.12 2019

Seminar über Theorie der kondensierten Materie / TRR146 Seminar

K. Binder/ S. Jabbari / A. Nikoubashman / F. Schmid / G. Settanni / T. Speck / M. Sulpizi / P. Virnau

10:30 Uhr s.t., Newtonraum, 01-122, Staudingerweg 9

Dr. Jianxiang Shen, Institut für Physik
Structure and properties of polymer nano-composites from molecular dynamics simulations
Freitag, 06.12 2019

Seminar Festkörper- und Grenzflächenphysik KOMET - experimentell

Institut für Physik

Sonderseminar: 10:00 Uhr s.t., MEDIEN-Raum, Staudinger Weg 7, 3. Stock, 03-431

Akashdeep Ghalayan, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
Heusler Alloys have been widely studied due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. Understanding the material's magnetic properties is crucial for deciding its device-based applications. Heusler alloys with high spin polarization (~100 %) and high Curie temperature (~1000 K) are one of the most preferred materials in this regard. The cobalt-based Co2MnAl (CMA) Heusler alloys exhibit more than 50% spin polarization even in the disordered phase with high Curie temperature (Tc ~ 697 K) which is beneficial for device applications. Thin films of CMA with different Co-Mn concentrations have been grown using DC magnetron sputtering at constant growth temperature (Ts ~ 400°C) and film thickness (~ 50 nm) to investigate the effect of Co/Mn concentrations on their electrical transport behavior. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that films possess the A2 disordered phase at room temperature. Magnetic anisotropy, which is vital for magnetic switching device applications, has been investigated using the Longitudinal Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect technique. LMOKE studies revealed the presence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in these films. The origin of the uniaxial anisotropy in our films is attributed to obliquely directed material flux onto the substrates during the film-growth.

Sonderseminar

Montag, 09.12 2019

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Kai Loo, Institut für Physik
Online Scintillator Internal Radioactivity Investigation System (OSIRIS) for JUNO

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Ethan Cline, MIT
In 2010 when the CREMA Collaboration released their measurement of the proton radius (Pohl et. al (2010)) from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy: rp=0.84184(67) fm. This was seven standard deviations smaller than the accepted 2010 CODATA value (0.8768(69) fm). This discrepancy lies at the heart of the proton radius puzzle. The MUon-Proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) was first proposed in 2012 to be the first muon-proton elastic scattering experiment with sufficient precision to address the proton radius puzzle. MUSE has the capacity to simultaneously measure elastic muon-proton, and electron-proton scattering, and switch polarities to measure with opposite charge states. As such, MUSE can directly measure the two-photon effect by comparing charge-states, and compare muon and electron scattering with minimal systematic error. By comparing the two measured scattering cross sections, the experiment will provide more data for the proton radius puzzle and determine if the radius is the same in electron and muon-proton scattering. We will review the motivation for and status of MUSE, which is due to begin production running in 2020. Initial analysis results will be shown from the summer 2019 beam time.

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Katerina Chrysalidis, Universität Mainz / CERN
Improving the spectral coverage and selectivity of the ISOLDE RILIS
Dienstag, 10.12 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Guoxing Wang, Peking University
The invariant mass distribution of top quark pair production is an important observable whose threshold behavior is sensitive to top-quark mass. In this talk, I will focus on the invariant mass distribution of top-quark pair production in threshold region and soft region. I will first talk about the resummation of Coulomb corrections in threshold limit β → 0. We combine the resummation with fixed-order results and present phenomenologically relevant numeric results. We find that the resummation effect significantly enhances the differential cross section in the threshold region, and makes the theoretical prediction more compatible with experimental data. As for soft limit z → 1, I’ll talk about the calculation of NNLO soft function which is a major bottleneck in pushing up the soft resummation accuracy of top-quark pair production. We show the non-trivial structure of three-parton correlations and the consistent extraction of NNLO soft fragmentation function. At the end, I’ll show the preliminary results of hard function and its application to transverse momentum resummation for top-quark pair production and decay in the future.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Laura Fabbietti, Physics Department, TU Munich
A new Laboratory to study Hadron-Hadron Interactions
Mittwoch, 11.12 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Torben Ferber, DESY Hamburg
Belle II in Japan is a flagship experiment at the intensity frontier that started data taking this year after massive upgrades of the accelerator and the detector. In this talk I will report on the performance of the Belle II detector and first rediscoveries with the 2019 dataset. In the second part of the talk I will give an overview about the planned Belle II physics program for the next year with a focus on searches for Dark Sectors and Long-Lived Particles.
Donnerstag, 12.12 2019

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

13:30 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Camilo Ulloa, Utrecht University, NL
In this talk I will discuss the main concepts of magnon transport through magnetic insulators. I will focus my talk on how to excite and manipulate magnetic degrees of freedom in ferromagnetic materials, and show some of the different ways we can model magnetic insulators, going from quantum mechanics to hydrodynamics.

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Guillaume Salomon, Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching
Developing new approaches to study quantum many-body systems is of fundamental importance in var­ious felds of physics ranging from high energy and condensed matter physics to quantum information and quantum computation. It also holds promise for a better understanding of materials, such as high-Tc superconductors, and fault-tolerant quantum computing which could strongly impact our modern soci­eties. Ultracold atoms have emerged as versatile and well controlled platforms to study fundamental problems in quantum many-body physics. In particular, spin-resolved quantum gas microscopy enables to probe strongly correlated fermions with a resolution down to the single particle and offers fascinating oppor­tunities for experiments. I will detail here this technique and discuss our recent experimental studies of the interplay between magnetism and doping in the Fermi-Hubbard model, a minimal model for high-Tc superconductivity.
zukünftige Termine
Montag, 16.12 2019

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Varvara Batozskaya, National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw
The measurement of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase phi_s in the Bs − B̄s system is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. It has been measured at the LHCb collaboration with several decay channels. Thanks to the precise prediction of the phi_s value in the frame of the Standard Model, it represents an excellent probe to search for new physics.

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Christoph Solbach, Universitätsklinikum Ulm
Zur Produktion von Zr-89 an einem PETtrace-Zyklotron
Dienstag, 17.12 2019

Theorie-Palaver

Institut für Physik

14:30 Uhr s.t., MITP seminar room

Fazlollah Hajkarim, Frankfurt University
Using the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) equation of state (EoS) from lattice calculations we investigated QCD effects on the first order primordial gravitational waves (PGWs) produced during the inflationary era. We also considered the cases for vanishing and nonvanishing lepton asymmetry where the latter one is constrained by cosmic microwave background experiments. Also, we investigated scenarios that inflation is succeeded by a phase where the energy density of the Universe was dominated by a scalar component with a general equation of state. Then we evaluated the spectrum of primordial gravitational waves induced in the post-inflationary Universe. We showed that if the energy density of the Universe was dominated by some specific fluid 𝜙 before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), its equation of state could be constrained by gravitational wave experiments. Moreover, we studied the effect of QCD and electroweak transitions on the induced (or second order) PGW from scalar perturbations which is different from the first order PGW spectrum. Finally, I briefly discuss the production of dark matter (DM) in an early matter era dominated by a heavy long lived scalar field.

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Jos Lelieveld, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz
Impacts of anthropogenic emissions on public health, rainfall and climate
Mittwoch, 18.12 2019

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Felix Kahlhoefer, RWTH Aachen
Over many years the experimental programme to search for dark matter has been guided by the so-called freeze-out paradigm, which assumes that interactions between the dark matter and Standard Model particles are comparable in strength to weak interactions. The non-observation of any dark matter signal has challenged this idea and led to a shift of focus towards dark matter models with even weaker interactions. At first sight, the chance of discovering such particles appears very low, but there are a number of exciting cases where potentially observable signals are predicted in spite of tiny couplings. I will present cosmological and phenomenological aspects of these models and discuss how existing and planned experiments can be used to search for such hidden particles.
Donnerstag, 19.12 2019

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

13:30 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Prof. Dennis Meier, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim
Domain walls naturally arise whenever a symmetry is spontaneously broken. They interconnect regions with different realizations of the broken symmetry, promoting structure formation from cosmological length scales to the atomic level. In my talk, I will present domain walls with unique functionalities which emerge in spin-spiral multiferroics and chiral magnets and which hold great promise for nanoelectronics and spintronics applications. In particular, I will discuss that a wide variety of new domain walls occurs in the presence of spatially modulated domain states. In contrast to domain walls in conventional ferroics, such domain walls exhibit a well-defined inner structure, which — analogous to cholesteric liquid crystals — consists of topological disclination and dislocation defects. Similar to the magnetic skyrmions, the domain walls can carry a finite topological charge, permitting an efficient coupling to spin currents and contributions to a topological Hall effect. Our studies establish domain walls in chiral magnets as functional nano-objects with non-trivial topology, opening the door to innovative device concepts in information and communication nanotechnology.

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Sile Nic Chormaic, OIST Graduate University, Okinawa, Japan
Ultrathin optical fibres, with diameters on the order of the propagating light wavelength, have already proven their versatility across a variety of different areas, such as sensing, particle manipulation, cold atom physics, and as optical couplers. The intense evanescent field at the fibre waist is one of the main advantages offered by these systems as it allows us to achieve ultrahigh light intensities that may otherwise not be attainable in a standard laboratory. In this talk, I will present work conducted at OIST with particular focus on our work on optical nanofibre-mediated multiphoton processes for the generation of highly excited Rydberg atoms and for exploring some other effects, such as quadrupole transitions and stimulated emission from Rb atoms. Overall, the versatility of these fibres for many different experimental platforms particularly if one goes beyond the basic, single mode fibre design will be promoted.
Montag, 06.01 2020

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Niklas Schmitt, University of Mainz
Dark Energy

Bachelorkolloqium

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Nadine Chiera, PSI, Schweiz
Chemical investigation of exotic radionuclides
Dienstag, 07.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Christian Enss , Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg
Small, Cold and Universal: Cryogenic Micro-Calorimeters a New Key Technology
Mittwoch, 08.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Cristina Lazzeroni, University Birmingham, UK
NA62 results on the K+ ➞ π+νν̄ decay
Donnerstag, 09.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Shane P. Kelly, Theoretical Division, LANL, Los Alamos, USA
In recent years, many experimental platforms have succeeded in producing quantumsystems that, on relevant time scales, are completely isolated from an environment. This opens the possibility of observing equilibrium states that are not described by standard thermal ensembles and long time dynamics that indefinitely maintain memory of initial states. In this talk, I discuss two mechanisms for this to occur: many body localization (MBL) and a novel mechanism which occurs in the semi-classical limit of a large spin. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the phenomenon of MBL in a disordered spin chain and its effects when coupled to a small environment. We model this small environment as a clean spin chain and find that, under sufficient coupling and disorder, the dirty chain can induce an MBL effect in the clean chain. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss the dynamics of a large spin evolving with a non-linear hamiltonian. Using semi-classical techniques, we identify when the spin does and does not thermalize. In doing so, we find a novel mechanism for the breakdown of thermalization based on the slow dynamics of an unstable fixed point.
Montag, 13.01 2020

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Julian Fischer, Institut für Physik
Development of an EM trigger algorithm in the ATLAS forward region

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Marine Vandebrouck, CEA Saclay
243Es, 249Md: from production cross-sections measurement to spectroscopy - Perspectives at GANIL-SPIRAL2/S3

Theoriekolloquium

Die Dozierenden der Theoretischen Physik

Sonderseminar: 14 Uhr c.t., Medienraum, Staudinger Weg 7, 03-431

Prof. James Freericks, Georgetown University, USA
Quantum mechanics was created with the matrix mechanics of Heisenberg, Born, and Jordan. Schroedingers wave mechanics shortly followed and allowed for simpler and more powerful calculations. Both Pauli and Dirac introduced a formulation of quantum mechanics based on operators and commutation relations, but it was never fully developed in the 1920s. Instead, Schroedinger formulated the operator approach with his factorization method, which later was adopted by the high-energy community as supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In this talk, I will explain how one can formulate all of quantum mechanics algebraically by a proper use of the translation operator on top of Schroedingers factorization method. I will give examples of how one can compute spherical harmonics algebraically, how one can find harmonic oscillator wavefunctions, and will even describe an operator-based derivation of the wavefunctions of Hydrogen. I will end with a proposal for a novel way to teach quantum mechanics, focusing first on conceptual ideas related to superposition, projective measurements, and entanglement. Then developing more conventional topics like spin, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, interacting spin models, central potentials, particles in a box and so on. This is the subject of a book in progress entitled Quantum Mechanics without Calculus.

Sonderseminar

Dienstag, 14.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Jan Meijer, Felix Bloch Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Leipzig
Deterministic creation of shallow NV centers in diamond by ion beam implantation
Mittwoch, 15.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Christian Fischer, Universität Gießen
Baryon spectra from QCD
Donnerstag, 16.01 2020

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

11:30 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Dr. Dongwook Go, FZ Juelich
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Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Jamir Marino, Institut für Physik, Universität Mainz
The talk will discuss instances of dynamical phases of interacting quantum many body models where coherent and dissipative dynamics occur on equal footing, shaping novel non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The first part of the talk will discuss long-range interacting quantum simulators where an external periodically driven field can stabilise phases without equilibrium counterpart against instabilities triggered by many body quantum fluctuations. In the second part, I will present an instance of ‘cold' time crystal occurring in open quantum systems, where neither MBL or pre-thermalisation are required to stabilise a strongly interacting non-equilibrium steady state. Time permitting, I will advertise some novel results on a purely dissipative analogue of long-range interacting quantum simulators, which can be implemented in quantum optics or solid state platforms.
Montag, 20.01 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Christoph Matejcek, Mainz
Low-energy beam transport system for MESA

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Zsolt Baranyi, Universität BRACCO
Thema folgt
Dienstag, 21.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Victorino Franco, Condensed Matter Physics, Universidad de Sevilla
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Mittwoch, 22.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Assumpta Parreno, Universitad de Barcelona
Lattice QCD calculations of/on light (hyper) nuclear systems
Donnerstag, 23.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Maria Chekhova, Institut für Optik, Information und Photonik, Universität Erlangen
Spontaneous parametric down-conversion is the workhorse of quantum optics. This process is used to generate entangled photon pairs and heralded single photons. When strongly pumped, spontaneous parametric down-conversion generates so many photon pairs that they overlap and form radiation with almost laser brightness. Despite being bright, this radiation manifests nonclassical effects: quadrature squeezing, photon-number correlations, and macroscopic entanglement. It has no coherent component and can be considered as amplified vacuum noise; it is therefore often called bright squeezed vacuum. In addition, strong photon-number fluctuations of bright squeezed vacuum make it extremely efficient for pumping multiphoton effects. My talk will cover this and other applications of strongly pumped parametric down-conversion. In addition, I will talk about the other extreme case of this process. Namely, if photon pairs are generated in a very thin nonlinear layer, the process does not require phase matching – in other words, the momentum of the pump photon is not conserved by the daughter photons. To demonstrate this, I will show the results of generating photon pairs from a 300 nm layer. This nanoscale generation of entangled photons offers unique radiative characteristics: the frequency-angular spectrum is extremely broad and as such it promises subwavelength and subcycle two-photon correlation widths in position and time, respectively. Additionally, it gives an insight into the subwavelength resonances for vacuum fluctuations.

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Prof Stephane Mangin, Nancy, France
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Montag, 27.01 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Alexey Tyukin, Mainz
Momentum transfer reconstruction for the P2 Experiment

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Christian Smorra, Institut für Physik, JGU Mainz
Precision measurements with antiprotons and transportable traps
Dienstag, 28.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Manfred Popp, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie
Was Hitlers Atombombe verhinderte - Kernphysik während des 2. Weltkrieges
Mittwoch, 29.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Jonathan Butterworth, UCL London
New physics and model independent measurements at the LHC
Donnerstag, 30.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Philipp Haslinger, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Österreich
Atom interferometry has proven within the last decades its surprising versatility to sense with high precision tiniest forces. In this talk I will give an overview of our recent work using an optical cavity enhanced atom interferometer to sense with gravitational strength for fifths forces [1,2] and for an on the first-place counterintuitive inertial property of blackbody radiation [3]. Blackbody (thermal) radiation is emitted by objects at finite temperature with an outward energy-momentum flow, which exerts an outward radiation pressure. At room temperature e. g. a cesium atom scatters on average less than one of these blackbody radiation photons every 10^8 years. Thus, it is generally assumed that any scattering force exerted on atoms by such radiation is negligible. However, particles also interact coherently with the thermal electromagnetic field [4] and this leads to a surprisingly strong force acting in the opposite direction of the radiation pressure [3]. If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field it might be detectable as a “fifth force” between normal-matter objects. In order to be consistent with cosmological observations and laboratory experiments, some leading theories use a screening mechanism to suppress this interaction. However, atom-interferometry presents a tool to reduce this screening [5] on so-called chameleon models [6]. By sensing the gravitational acceleration of a 0.19 kg in vacuum source mass which is 10^-8 times weaker than Earth´s gravity, we reach a natural bound for cosmological motivated scalar field theories and were able to place tight constraints [1,2]. [1] P. Hamilton, M. Jaffe, P. Haslinger, Q. Simmons, H. Müller, J. Khoury, Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy, Science. 349 (2015) 849–851. [2] M. Jaffe, P. Haslinger, V. Xu, P. Hamilton, A. Upadhye, B. Elder, J. Khoury, H. Müller, Testing sub-gravitational forces on atoms from a miniature, in-vacuum source mass, Nat. Phys. 13 (2017) 938–942. [3] P. Haslinger, M. Jaffe, V. Xu, O. Schwartz, M. Sonnleitner, M. Ritsch-Marte, H. Ritsch, H. Müller, Attractive force on atoms due to blackbody radiation, Nat. Phys. 14 (2018) 257–260. [4] M. Sonnleitner, M. Ritsch-Marte, H. Ritsch, Attractive Optical Forces from Blackbody Radiation, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 23601. [5] C. Burrage, E.J. Copeland, E.A. Hinds, Probing dark energy with atom interferometry, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 2015 (2015) 042–042. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2015/03/042. [6] B. Elder, J. Khoury, P. Haslinger, M. Jaffe, H. Müller, P. Hamilton, Chameleon dark energy and atom interferometry, Phys. Rev. D. 94 (2016) 44051.

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Prof. Matthias Wuttig, RWTH Aachen
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Samstag, 01.02 2020

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

PD Dr. Markus Garst, KIT, Karlsruhe
tba
Montag, 03.02 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Oliver Noll, Mainz
Digital signal processing for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Prof. Dr. Bernd Krause, Universität Rostock
Thema folgt
Dienstag, 04.02 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Dr. Friederike Otto, ECI, University of Oxford
Angry Weather How Climate Change is affecting extreme Weather around the World