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Jahresübersicht für das Jahr 2020

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Montag, 06.01 2020

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Niklas Schmitt, University of Mainz
Dark Energy

Bachelorkolloqium

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Nadine Chiera, PSI, Schweiz
Chemical investigation of exotic radionuclides
Dienstag, 07.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Christian Enss , Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Heidelberg
Small, Cold and Universal: Cryogenic Micro-Calorimeters a New Key Technology
Mittwoch, 08.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Cristina Lazzeroni, University Birmingham, UK
NA62 results on the K+ ➞ π+νν̄ decay
Donnerstag, 09.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Shane P. Kelly, Theoretical Division, LANL, Los Alamos, USA
In recent years, many experimental platforms have succeeded in producing quantumsystems that, on relevant time scales, are completely isolated from an environment. This opens the possibility of observing equilibrium states that are not described by standard thermal ensembles and long time dynamics that indefinitely maintain memory of initial states. In this talk, I discuss two mechanisms for this to occur: many body localization (MBL) and a novel mechanism which occurs in the semi-classical limit of a large spin. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss the phenomenon of MBL in a disordered spin chain and its effects when coupled to a small environment. We model this small environment as a clean spin chain and find that, under sufficient coupling and disorder, the dirty chain can induce an MBL effect in the clean chain. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss the dynamics of a large spin evolving with a non-linear hamiltonian. Using semi-classical techniques, we identify when the spin does and does not thermalize. In doing so, we find a novel mechanism for the breakdown of thermalization based on the slow dynamics of an unstable fixed point.
Montag, 13.01 2020

Seminar about Experimental Particle and Astroparticle Physics (ETAP)

Institut für Physik

12:30 Uhr s.t., Staudingerweg 7, Minkowskiraum

Julian Fischer, Institut für Physik
Development of an EM trigger algorithm in the ATLAS forward region

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Marine Vandebrouck, CEA Saclay
243Es, 249Md: from production cross-sections measurement to spectroscopy - Perspectives at GANIL-SPIRAL2/S3

Theoriekolloquium

Die Dozierenden der Theoretischen Physik

Sonderseminar: 14 Uhr c.t., Medienraum, Staudinger Weg 7, 03-431

Prof. James Freericks, Georgetown University, USA
Quantum mechanics was created with the matrix mechanics of Heisenberg, Born, and Jordan. Schroedingers wave mechanics shortly followed and allowed for simpler and more powerful calculations. Both Pauli and Dirac introduced a formulation of quantum mechanics based on operators and commutation relations, but it was never fully developed in the 1920s. Instead, Schroedinger formulated the operator approach with his factorization method, which later was adopted by the high-energy community as supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In this talk, I will explain how one can formulate all of quantum mechanics algebraically by a proper use of the translation operator on top of Schroedingers factorization method. I will give examples of how one can compute spherical harmonics algebraically, how one can find harmonic oscillator wavefunctions, and will even describe an operator-based derivation of the wavefunctions of Hydrogen. I will end with a proposal for a novel way to teach quantum mechanics, focusing first on conceptual ideas related to superposition, projective measurements, and entanglement. Then developing more conventional topics like spin, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, interacting spin models, central potentials, particles in a box and so on. This is the subject of a book in progress entitled Quantum Mechanics without Calculus.

Sonderseminar

Dienstag, 14.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Jan Meijer, Felix Bloch Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Leipzig
Deterministic creation of shallow NV centers in diamond by ion beam implantation
Mittwoch, 15.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Christian Fischer, Universität Gießen
Baryon spectra from QCD
Donnerstag, 16.01 2020

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

11:30 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Dr. Dongwook Go, FZ Juelich
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Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Jamir Marino, Institut für Physik, Universität Mainz
The talk will discuss instances of dynamical phases of interacting quantum many body models where coherent and dissipative dynamics occur on equal footing, shaping novel non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The first part of the talk will discuss long-range interacting quantum simulators where an external periodically driven field can stabilise phases without equilibrium counterpart against instabilities triggered by many body quantum fluctuations. In the second part, I will present an instance of ‘cold' time crystal occurring in open quantum systems, where neither MBL or pre-thermalisation are required to stabilise a strongly interacting non-equilibrium steady state. Time permitting, I will advertise some novel results on a purely dissipative analogue of long-range interacting quantum simulators, which can be implemented in quantum optics or solid state platforms.
Montag, 20.01 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Christoph Matejcek, Mainz
Low-energy beam transport system for MESA

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Zsolt Baranyi, Universität BRACCO
Thema folgt
Dienstag, 21.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Victorino Franco, Condensed Matter Physics, Universidad de Sevilla
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Mittwoch, 22.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Assumpta Parreno, Universitad de Barcelona
Lattice QCD calculations of/on light (hyper) nuclear systems
Donnerstag, 23.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Dr. Maria Chekhova, Institut für Optik, Information und Photonik, Universität Erlangen
Spontaneous parametric down-conversion is the workhorse of quantum optics. This process is used to generate entangled photon pairs and heralded single photons. When strongly pumped, spontaneous parametric down-conversion generates so many photon pairs that they overlap and form radiation with almost laser brightness. Despite being bright, this radiation manifests nonclassical effects: quadrature squeezing, photon-number correlations, and macroscopic entanglement. It has no coherent component and can be considered as amplified vacuum noise; it is therefore often called bright squeezed vacuum. In addition, strong photon-number fluctuations of bright squeezed vacuum make it extremely efficient for pumping multiphoton effects. My talk will cover this and other applications of strongly pumped parametric down-conversion. In addition, I will talk about the other extreme case of this process. Namely, if photon pairs are generated in a very thin nonlinear layer, the process does not require phase matching – in other words, the momentum of the pump photon is not conserved by the daughter photons. To demonstrate this, I will show the results of generating photon pairs from a 300 nm layer. This nanoscale generation of entangled photons offers unique radiative characteristics: the frequency-angular spectrum is extremely broad and as such it promises subwavelength and subcycle two-photon correlation widths in position and time, respectively. Additionally, it gives an insight into the subwavelength resonances for vacuum fluctuations.

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Prof Stephane Mangin, Nancy, France
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Montag, 27.01 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Alexey Tyukin, Mainz
Momentum transfer reconstruction for the P2 Experiment

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Dr. Christian Smorra, Institut für Physik, JGU Mainz
Precision measurements with antiprotons and transportable traps
Dienstag, 28.01 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Professor Manfred Popp, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie
Was Hitlers Atombombe verhinderte - Kernphysik während des 2. Weltkrieges
Mittwoch, 29.01 2020

PRISMA Colloquium

Institut für Physik

13:00 Uhr s.t., Lorentz-Raum 05-127, Staudingerweg 7

Jonathan Butterworth, UCL London
New physics and model independent measurements at the LHC
Donnerstag, 30.01 2020

Seminar über Quanten-, Atom- und Neutronenphysik (QUANTUM)

Institut für Physik

14 Uhr c.t., Lorentz-Raum (05-127), Staudingerweg 7

Prof. Dr. Philipp Haslinger, Atominstitut, TU Wien, Österreich
Atom interferometry has proven within the last decades its surprising versatility to sense with high precision tiniest forces. In this talk I will give an overview of our recent work using an optical cavity enhanced atom interferometer to sense with gravitational strength for fifths forces [1,2] and for an on the first-place counterintuitive inertial property of blackbody radiation [3]. Blackbody (thermal) radiation is emitted by objects at finite temperature with an outward energy-momentum flow, which exerts an outward radiation pressure. At room temperature e. g. a cesium atom scatters on average less than one of these blackbody radiation photons every 10^8 years. Thus, it is generally assumed that any scattering force exerted on atoms by such radiation is negligible. However, particles also interact coherently with the thermal electromagnetic field [4] and this leads to a surprisingly strong force acting in the opposite direction of the radiation pressure [3]. If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field it might be detectable as a “fifth force” between normal-matter objects. In order to be consistent with cosmological observations and laboratory experiments, some leading theories use a screening mechanism to suppress this interaction. However, atom-interferometry presents a tool to reduce this screening [5] on so-called chameleon models [6]. By sensing the gravitational acceleration of a 0.19 kg in vacuum source mass which is 10^-8 times weaker than Earth´s gravity, we reach a natural bound for cosmological motivated scalar field theories and were able to place tight constraints [1,2]. [1] P. Hamilton, M. Jaffe, P. Haslinger, Q. Simmons, H. Müller, J. Khoury, Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy, Science. 349 (2015) 849–851. [2] M. Jaffe, P. Haslinger, V. Xu, P. Hamilton, A. Upadhye, B. Elder, J. Khoury, H. Müller, Testing sub-gravitational forces on atoms from a miniature, in-vacuum source mass, Nat. Phys. 13 (2017) 938–942. [3] P. Haslinger, M. Jaffe, V. Xu, O. Schwartz, M. Sonnleitner, M. Ritsch-Marte, H. Ritsch, H. Müller, Attractive force on atoms due to blackbody radiation, Nat. Phys. 14 (2018) 257–260. [4] M. Sonnleitner, M. Ritsch-Marte, H. Ritsch, Attractive Optical Forces from Blackbody Radiation, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 23601. [5] C. Burrage, E.J. Copeland, E.A. Hinds, Probing dark energy with atom interferometry, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 2015 (2015) 042–042. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2015/03/042. [6] B. Elder, J. Khoury, P. Haslinger, M. Jaffe, H. Müller, P. Hamilton, Chameleon dark energy and atom interferometry, Phys. Rev. D. 94 (2016) 44051.

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

Prof. Matthias Wuttig, RWTH Aachen
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Samstag, 01.02 2020

SFB/TR49/SFB TRR 173 Spin+X-Kolloquium - Seminar experimentelle Physik der kondensierten Materie

SFB/TR49 - Prof. Dr. Elmers

14:00 Uhr s.t., MAINZ-Seminarraum, Staudinger Weg 9, 03-122

PD Dr. Markus Garst, KIT, Karlsruhe
tba
Montag, 03.02 2020

Institutsseminar Kern- und Hadronenphysik

Institut für Kernphysik

14 Uhr c.t., HS Kernphysik, Becherweg 45

Oliver Noll, Mainz
Digital signal processing for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

Seminar für Kern- und Radiochemie

Institut für Kernchemie

16 Uhr c.t., Seminarraum Kernchemie

Prof. Dr. Bernd Krause, Universität Rostock
Thema folgt
Dienstag, 04.02 2020

Physikalisches Kolloquium

Institut für Kernphysik, Johann Joachim Becher Weg 45

16 Uhr c.t., HS KPH

Dr. Friederike Otto, ECI, University of Oxford
Angry Weather How Climate Change is affecting extreme Weather around the World